Monday, June 27, 2005

Gregory "Atticus" Peck


Just watched To Kill a Mockingbird and, my oh my, that Gregory Peck sure was terrific in his most famous role as Atticus Finch. While many movie fans dream of voting on the Oscars sometimes it would be a real bitch; Imagine having to choose between Peck, who won the Oscar, and Peter O'Toole's towering title role in Lawrence of Arabia. Don't you just wish that sometimes they could hand out two statues? It must be excruciating to vote when there are two or more performances deserving of a spot in the history books. I would've checked O'Toole's name personally... but not without a lump in my throat for old Atticus.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Peck should've won (if nominated) for his role in Wyler's The Big Country. It's his most classy, appealing and calm performance.

Oh, how can I say that?

What about Roman Holiday?

No, No, AMPAS was right. To Kill a Mockinbird is his top. But, what about O'Toole? I'm confused.

Caleb

Anonymous said...

Another toughie is somehow deciding between Bette Davis in All About Eve and Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard. Practically impossible.

Anonymous said...

I haven't seen Lawrence of Arabia, but Mockingbird was indeed excellent.

Between Davis and Swanson? I think I just have to go with Swanson. I cannot imagine anyone else saying those lines.

...granted I wasn't alive then so I can't think of any obscure left-of-centre choices.

I find it kind of funny (albiet, NOT AT ALL) that the Academy, as of late, seems to make my toughest decisions for me.

Who would I have voted for out of Lynch and Luhrmann in 2002 of Lurhmann had not of been snubbed. And vice versa with best film!

I know it's incredibly un-buffian (er, as in movie buff) of me to admit this but Mulholland Drive and Moulin Rouge! are my two favourite movies of all time. I know it's not right to have to such recent movies be #1 and #2 but I can't help it.

Update on 1954 - I watched On The Waterfront last night... WOW. Pretty spectacular. Rear Window is still my fave 1954 (hell, it's my #4 of all time, i think it'll stay that way for a while) but this was still A work. I also remembered I had seen Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, however unfortunate that may be.

She'll be cryin' cryin' indeed.

-Glenn

par3182 said...

when forced to choose between two men i love, i always go for the prettier one (it's shallow, and i regret it in the long run, but how else to make a tough decision?)

darkcypherlad said...

I would've voted for Peck. Both gave terrific performances, so I would have to rely on other factors to make my decision: the film itself, the actors' respective careers, etc. And if it comes down to beauty (which I hope it wouldn't!), Peck would beat O' Toole any day.

But oh, 1962 was such a terrific year for male performances (and female ones too) that it would've been hard to even choose five nominees instead of 10 or 15. Some examples: James Mason, "Lolita," Paul Newman, "Sweet Bird of Youth" (terrible film, and Geraldine Page gave her usual grating performance, but he was quite good), Robert Mitchum, "Two for the Seesaw" OR "Cape Fear," John Wayne and James Stewart, "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance," Montgomery Clift, "Freud," Lawrence Harvey, "The Manchurian Candidate," Tom Courtenay, "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner," Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea, "Ride the High Country," Ralph Richardson, "Long Day's Journey Into Night," Jason Robards, "Tender is the Night," Burt Lancaster, "Bird Man of Alcatraz," Oskar Werner, "Jules and Jim" (he was elgible that year according to Inside Oscar), Terence Stamp and Robert Ryan for "Billy Budd" and...well, I can go on and on.

My nominee ballot would include Peck, O' Toole, Mason, Clift and Richardson, with Peck edging Mason for the win. What a great year for movies!

david m said...

Peck's Atticus gets my vote over O'Toole as Lawrence. Both good. Peck better. One of greatest performances of all time. Quiet. Solid. Just what the role called for.

But O'Toole should have won in 1968 for The Lion in Winter.

The nominees in 1968:

Peter O'Toole (The Lion in Winter): A+
Alan Bates (The Fixer): A
Cliff Robertson (Charly): B+ (winner)
Alan Arkin (The Heart is a Lonely Hunter): B+
Ron Moody (Oliver): B-

Anonymous said...

Oh, God!

Oliver = D

I know swearing doesn't happen much on here but thank fucking god that that ended before I threw something at the TV. Saved by a typically well-done chase scene. But I wouldn't expect anything less from a chase scene directed by Carol Reed. Man, I loves me some Third Man and Odd Man Out.

-Glenn

david m said...

Agreed.

Oliver should never have won the Best Picture Oscar in 1968. It's right up there with Chariots of Fire on the most undeserving list.

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