Monday, November 12, 2007

20:07 (Trouble, Trouble, Trouble)

screenshots from the 20th minute and 7th second of a movie
I can't guarantee the same results at home (different players/timing) I use a VLC

Mothers of river city. Heed that warning before it’s too late. Watch for the telltale signs of corruption. The minute your son leaves the house… does he rebutton his knickerbockers?! Belooooow the knee?

8 comments:

Brian said...

Loved this scene when I was a kid. I haven't seen this film in decades, but seeing this screencap makes me wonder for a moment if it subtly influenced my life in ways I've never acknowledged: I moved to Iowa for college (where I played clarinet in a student-initiated concert band one semester, actually) and now I work in a library...

Anonymous said...

I loved this one too-it's so big and brassy and colorful!

Sam said...

As a kid I always felt drawn to Robert Preston. I wonder why?

Jimmy said...

He wasn't nominated for this! Kind of a surprised. Only one nomination for Robert Presenton - "Victor / Victoria" - supporting actor. I loved "Music Man" growing up...loved it. I still like it - but it looks very very Warner-Brothers-back-lot... you can see hills all over in the outdoor shots. Pick a little talk a lot!

NATHANIEL R said...

one thing I really like about this movie is the segueway out of this number. older musicals have such natural ease with the form, such confidence beginning and ending the numbers. i wonder why today's filmmakers just can't trust the medium more. audiences like it...stop pretending they don't! (sweeney todd is just worrying me so much lately. ARGH)

Deborah said...

I love this movie so very, very much.

Anonymous said...

This was another of my favorites as a kid - Robert Preston was just wonderful. It didn't feel as big or impressive or famous as some other musicals but it had charm in spades.

I need to see this again.

RedSatinDoll

Cliff Johnson said...

One of my favorite film musicals!

What's so refreshing about this movie is that it's unafraid to sing its great big heart out.

And dance, too!

The choreographer, Onna White, has never truly received the credit she so richly deserved for her jubilant, downright acrobatic dance numbers in this film, especially in the sequence following the first rendition of "76 Trombones."

She belongs in the same breath as Jerome Robbins for West Side Story and Bob Fosse for Cabaret.