Saturday, April 15, 2006

Reading
Cinemarati my post on Friends with Money
MSNBC even corporate behemoths miss Michelle Pfeiffer.
Burbanked Mission Hollywood: Slumming is the New Cool
Popped Culture The losing battle with religious extremists of all persuasions.

Watching
Titanic Two: The Surface

4 comments:

Marcelo said...

Your question: Which actors can play depression well without depressing the audience unduly or dulling the liveliness of the film they’re in?

I think it depends mostly on the directing and the writing. I could only name some performances of depressing characters that called my attention - sometimes it is even hard to classify as a performance dealing with depression and how much of it:

Gillian Anderson (The House of Mirth)
Nicolas Cage (Leaving Las Vegas)
Helena Bonham Carter (The Wings of the Dove)
Glenn Close (The House of the Spirits)
Jennifer Connely (The House of Sand and Fog)
Ralph Fiennes (The Constant Gardener)
Richard Harris (The Field)
I know you do not like her, the film and the performance, but I think she has great moments with depression - Helen Hunt (As Good As it Gets)
Julianne Moore (The End of the Affair)
Nick Nolte (The Prince of Tides)
Lena Olin (Chocolat) - most people did not notice another great performance by the Swedish.
Our favorite has managed at least two excellent performances dealing with depression - Michelle Pfeiffer (The Deep End of the Ocean and Frankie and Johnny)
Charlotte Rampling (Under the Sand)
Stephen Rea (The End of the Affair)
Sissy Spacek (In the Bedroom)
Tom Wilkinson (In the Bedroom)

JK said...

hey Nathaniel! Peter O'Toole has joined the cast of Stardust! Pfeiffer, DeNiro, O'Toole, Alfred Molina, Claire Danes, what a fantastic cast! I'm sure you're excited!

the boyfriend said...

the problem with Friends w/Money is not just Aniston (although, yes, casting an actor with no talent generally has never helped a project). The problem is that the movie is nastily cynical. And you kids don't really know me, so you'll just have to trust me when I say that when a movie's too cynical for even my taste, well, that's a whole mess o' nasty. The point, made over and over, in increasingly bludgeoning moves, is that money = happiness. Which, yes, may be true. But do you really need a stoned Jennifer Aniston making that point to you?

Tram said...

Ugh, I am so sad about the WOM in regards to Friends with Money (still haven't seen it yet though).

I adored Lovely & Amazing.

Is Holofcener losing her touch? :(